Discussion:
converting from oil furnace to electric furnace
(too old to reply)
IRONMAN
2008-05-28 21:00:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
davehx
2008-05-28 22:05:52 UTC
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Raw Message
well..my folks have an electric furnace for sale. 3 years old. if it
interests you
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
jim
2008-05-28 22:31:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.
David
2008-05-29 01:42:25 UTC
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Raw Message
Electric will definitely increase, but seeing that about 50% of the island's
electric is hydro generation, the increase in crude does not have the same
degree of cost affect on electrical prices....


David
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.
Vaq2
2008-05-29 04:46:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
yea but they'll increase it just to make more money :) not because they have
to
Post by David
Electric will definitely increase, but seeing that about 50% of the
island's electric is hydro generation, the increase in crude does not have
the same degree of cost affect on electrical prices....
David
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.
David
2008-05-29 11:21:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
seeing as the majority of electrical generation is performed by a crown
corporation, profit is also not as large of a driver... and the fact that
the Public Utilities Board has to be shown convincing reasons why the rates
should be increased...


David.
Post by Vaq2
yea but they'll increase it just to make more money :) not because they
have to
Post by David
Electric will definitely increase, but seeing that about 50% of the
island's electric is hydro generation, the increase in crude does not
have the same degree of cost affect on electrical prices....
David
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.
jim
2008-05-29 12:29:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David
seeing as the majority of electrical generation is performed by a crown
corporation, profit is also not as large of a driver... and the fact that
the Public Utilities Board has to be shown convincing reasons why the rates
should be increased...
Because at the present 40% of the power generated by Hydro is from the
Holyrood Generating Station. Another percentage (high) is from the
30-40 stand alone diesel generating stations across the island. This
does not include what is in Labrador + back ups. So if 40% (from
Holyrood alone) of the electricity generated by hydro is from fossil
fuels with oil at 130+ a barrel there is not much convincing required.
PUB 3% in January, another 10% increase around the corner. Hydro may
not operate at a profit but NL Power does. Holyrood (worked there) was
a back up generating system. Only turned on when the Bay D Sp went
down or required repairs. Holyrood is full time now. Holyrood will be
mothballed only when the Lower Churchill is running - and thats a long
ways away. Until then heating costs will continue to increase be it
oil or electric - IMO
Post by David
Post by Vaq2
yea but they'll increase it just to make more money :) not because they
have to
Post by David
Electric will definitely increase, but seeing that about 50% of the
island's electric is hydro generation, the increase in crude does not
have the same degree of cost affect on electrical prices....
David
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000.  This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
David
2008-05-29 23:57:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Well... as I read the 2006 NL Hydro Annual Report (and NLHydro accounts for
about 80% of Island power generation)...

http://www.nlh.nl.ca/Hydroweb/hydroweb.nsf/GeneralDocs/7B31B9481000FB60A32572E4003F950E/$File/Annual%20Report_web_Final.pdf

From Page 81:

2006 Gross Island Interconnected Energy Supply
Hydraulic Generation: 79%
Power Purchases: 7%
Thermal Generation: 13%


Holyrood is pretty much the full 13%... the Diesel and Gas Turbines you say
are a large cost account for less than 0.04% of the total island electrical
generation. I truly doubt that the few small gas turbines in Labrador can
account for the large percentage you believe exists.


Not sure where you got your stats????


David.
Post by jim
Post by David
seeing as the majority of electrical generation is performed by a crown
corporation, profit is also not as large of a driver... and the fact that
the Public Utilities Board has to be shown convincing reasons why the rates
should be increased...
Because at the present 40% of the power generated by Hydro is from the
Holyrood Generating Station. Another percentage (high) is from the
30-40 stand alone diesel generating stations across the island. This
does not include what is in Labrador + back ups. So if 40% (from
Holyrood alone) of the electricity generated by hydro is from fossil
fuels with oil at 130+ a barrel there is not much convincing required.
PUB 3% in January, another 10% increase around the corner. Hydro may
not operate at a profit but NL Power does. Holyrood (worked there) was
a back up generating system. Only turned on when the Bay D Sp went
down or required repairs. Holyrood is full time now. Holyrood will be
mothballed only when the Lower Churchill is running - and thats a long
ways away. Until then heating costs will continue to increase be it
oil or electric - IMO
Post by David
yea but they'll increase it just to make more money :) not because they
have to
Post by David
Electric will definitely increase, but seeing that about 50% of the
island's electric is hydro generation, the increase in crude does not
have the same degree of cost affect on electrical prices....
David
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
jim
2008-05-30 00:17:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Well... as I read the 2006 NL Hydro Annual Report  (and NLHydro accounts for
about 80% of Island power generation)...
http://www.nlh.nl.ca/Hydroweb/hydroweb.nsf/GeneralDocs/7B31B9481000FB...
2006 Gross Island Interconnected Energy Supply
Hydraulic Generation:  79%
Power Purchases: 7%
Thermal Generation: 13%
Holyrood is pretty much the full 13%...  the Diesel and Gas Turbines you say
are a large cost account for less than 0.04% of the total island electrical
generation.  I truly doubt that the few small gas turbines in Labrador can
account for the large percentage you believe exists.
Not sure where you got your stats????
David.
Post by jim
Post by David
seeing as the majority of electrical generation is performed by a crown
corporation, profit is also not as large of a driver... and the fact that
the Public Utilities Board has to be shown convincing reasons why the rates
should be increased...
Because at the present 40% of the power generated by Hydro is from the
Holyrood Generating Station. Another percentage (high) is from the
30-40 stand alone diesel generating stations across the island. This
does not include what is in Labrador + back ups. So if 40% (from
Holyrood alone) of the electricity generated by hydro is from fossil
fuels with oil at 130+ a barrel there is not much convincing required.
PUB 3% in January, another 10% increase around the corner. Hydro may
not operate at a profit but NL Power does. Holyrood (worked there) was
a back up generating system. Only turned on when the Bay D Sp went
down or required repairs. Holyrood is full time now. Holyrood will be
mothballed only when the Lower Churchill is running - and thats a long
ways away. Until then heating costs will continue to increase be it
oil or electric - IMO
Post by David
yea but they'll increase it just to make more money :) not because they
have to
Post by David
Electric will definitely increase, but seeing that about 50% of the
island's electric is hydro generation, the increase in crude does not
have the same degree of cost affect on electrical prices....
David
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
http://www.nlh.nl.ca/Hydroweb/hydroweb.nsf/GeneralDocs/18C5A3C549162EBAA3256FD6006EF4B5?OpenDocument&menucat=About%20Hydro&submenucat=Holyrood%20Generating%20Station&linkname=About%20Holyrood
jim
2008-05-30 00:21:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Well... as I read the 2006 NL Hydro Annual Report  (and NLHydro accounts for
about 80% of Island power generation)...
http://www.nlh.nl.ca/Hydroweb/hydroweb.nsf/GeneralDocs/7B31B9481000FB...
2006 Gross Island Interconnected Energy Supply
Hydraulic Generation:  79%
Power Purchases: 7%
Thermal Generation: 13%
Holyrood is pretty much the full 13%...  the Diesel and Gas Turbines you say
are a large cost account for less than 0.04% of the total island electrical
generation.  I truly doubt that the few small gas turbines in Labrador can
account for the large percentage you believe exists.
Not sure where you got your stats????
David.
Post by jim
Post by David
seeing as the majority of electrical generation is performed by a crown
corporation, profit is also not as large of a driver... and the fact that
the Public Utilities Board has to be shown convincing reasons why the rates
should be increased...
Because at the present 40% of the power generated by Hydro is from the
Holyrood Generating Station. Another percentage (high) is from the
30-40 stand alone diesel generating stations across the island. This
does not include what is in Labrador + back ups. So if 40% (from
Holyrood alone) of the electricity generated by hydro is from fossil
fuels with oil at 130+ a barrel there is not much convincing required.
PUB 3% in January, another 10% increase around the corner. Hydro may
not operate at a profit but NL Power does. Holyrood (worked there) was
a back up generating system. Only turned on when the Bay D Sp went
down or required repairs. Holyrood is full time now. Holyrood will be
mothballed only when the Lower Churchill is running - and thats a long
ways away. Until then heating costs will continue to increase be it
oil or electric - IMO
Post by David
yea but they'll increase it just to make more money :) not because they
have to
Post by David
Electric will definitely increase, but seeing that about 50% of the
island's electric is hydro generation, the increase in crude does not
have the same degree of cost affect on electrical prices....
David
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
http://www.nlh.nl.ca/Hydroweb/hydroweb.nsf/GeneralDocs/A5FED4C87E741D3FA3256FD700786A3B?OpenDocument&menucat=About%20Hydro&submenucat=Transmission%20%26%20Rural%20Operations&linkname=About%20TRO
David
2008-05-30 03:26:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Re-read both of your links again, my friend. They speak about generating
CAPACITY, not what these systems are actually generating.

The fuel-based thermal generation is designed to be able to provide
emergency power generation when required... for example, the Gas Turbine in
Stephenville which is capable of providing 54MW of power was there to
support the now-torn-down paper mill, which by chance, has a peak load
demand of around 50MW... additionally, some of these turbines are used to
provide spinning reserve for peak power-consumption periods... you will
sometimes see, for example, the gas turbine next to the TCH at Paradise
started up during peak hours. (it is MUCH quicker to start one of the two
25MW jet engine-based turbines in that location than to cycle up more hydro
power or generate additional steam-based power at Holyrood... think in terms
of seconds as compared to possibly hours or delay)

There is a lot of generating capacity at Holyrood as well that is never
used... if there is a severe shortage of rain, for example, then the
additional capacity can be used to supplement the reduced availability of
hydro power... or consider when maintenance on the Bay D'Espoir system is
completed which reduces its capacity....

I completely understand the confusion when reviewing the NL Hydro
documentation on their site because it is basically doing a PR job to
showcase the capabilities of the organization... it does not, though,
represent the actual generation of power that is normal.


Cheers,

David.
Well... as I read the 2006 NL Hydro Annual Report (and NLHydro accounts
for
about 80% of Island power generation)...
http://www.nlh.nl.ca/Hydroweb/hydroweb.nsf/GeneralDocs/7B31B9481000FB...
2006 Gross Island Interconnected Energy Supply
Hydraulic Generation: 79%
Power Purchases: 7%
Thermal Generation: 13%
Holyrood is pretty much the full 13%... the Diesel and Gas Turbines you
say
are a large cost account for less than 0.04% of the total island electrical
generation. I truly doubt that the few small gas turbines in Labrador can
account for the large percentage you believe exists.
Not sure where you got your stats????
David.
Post by jim
Post by David
seeing as the majority of electrical generation is performed by a crown
corporation, profit is also not as large of a driver... and the fact that
the Public Utilities Board has to be shown convincing reasons why the rates
should be increased...
Because at the present 40% of the power generated by Hydro is from the
Holyrood Generating Station. Another percentage (high) is from the
30-40 stand alone diesel generating stations across the island. This
does not include what is in Labrador + back ups. So if 40% (from
Holyrood alone) of the electricity generated by hydro is from fossil
fuels with oil at 130+ a barrel there is not much convincing required.
PUB 3% in January, another 10% increase around the corner. Hydro may
not operate at a profit but NL Power does. Holyrood (worked there) was
a back up generating system. Only turned on when the Bay D Sp went
down or required repairs. Holyrood is full time now. Holyrood will be
mothballed only when the Lower Churchill is running - and thats a long
ways away. Until then heating costs will continue to increase be it
oil or electric - IMO
Post by David
yea but they'll increase it just to make more money :) not because they
have to
Post by David
Electric will definitely increase, but seeing that about 50% of the
island's electric is hydro generation, the increase in crude does not
have the same degree of cost affect on electrical prices....
David
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
http://www.nlh.nl.ca/Hydroweb/hydroweb.nsf/GeneralDocs/A5FED4C87E741D3FA3256FD700786A3B?OpenDocument&menucat=About%20Hydro&submenucat=Transmission%20%26%20Rural%20Operations&linkname=About%20TRO
Murph
2008-06-04 13:30:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David
Re-read both of your links again, my friend. They speak about generating
CAPACITY, not what these systems are actually generating.
The fuel-based thermal generation is designed to be able to provide
emergency power generation when required... for example, the Gas Turbine in
Stephenville which is capable of providing 54MW of power was there to
support the now-torn-down paper mill, which by chance, has a peak load
demand of around 50MW... additionally, some of these turbines are used to
provide spinning reserve for peak power-consumption periods... you will
sometimes see, for example, the gas turbine next to the TCH at Paradise
started up during peak hours. (it is MUCH quicker to start one of the two
25MW jet engine-based turbines in that location than to cycle up more hydro
power or generate additional steam-based power at Holyrood... think in terms
of seconds as compared to possibly hours or delay)
There is a lot of generating capacity at Holyrood as well that is never
used... if there is a severe shortage of rain, for example, then the
additional capacity can be used to supplement the reduced availability of
hydro power... or consider when maintenance on the Bay D'Espoir system is
completed which reduces its capacity....
I completely understand the confusion when reviewing the NL Hydro
documentation on their site because it is basically doing a PR job to
showcase the capabilities of the organization... it does not, though,
represent the actual generation of power that is normal.
Cheers,
David.
Well... as I read the 2006 NL Hydro Annual Report (and NLHydro accounts
for
about 80% of Island power generation)...
http://www.nlh.nl.ca/Hydroweb/hydroweb.nsf/GeneralDocs/7B31B9481000FB...
2006 Gross Island Interconnected Energy Supply
Hydraulic Generation: 79%
Power Purchases: 7%
Thermal Generation: 13%
Holyrood is pretty much the full 13%... the Diesel and Gas Turbines you
say
are a large cost account for less than 0.04% of the total island electrical
generation. I truly doubt that the few small gas turbines in Labrador can
account for the large percentage you believe exists.
Not sure where you got your stats????
David.
Post by jim
Post by David
seeing as the majority of electrical generation is performed by a crown
corporation, profit is also not as large of a driver... and the fact that
the Public Utilities Board has to be shown convincing reasons why the rates
should be increased...
Because at the present 40% of the power generated by Hydro is from the
Holyrood Generating Station. Another percentage (high) is from the
30-40 stand alone diesel generating stations across the island. This
does not include what is in Labrador + back ups. So if 40% (from
Holyrood alone) of the electricity generated by hydro is from fossil
fuels with oil at 130+ a barrel there is not much convincing required.
PUB 3% in January, another 10% increase around the corner. Hydro may
not operate at a profit but NL Power does. Holyrood (worked there) was
a back up generating system. Only turned on when the Bay D Sp went
down or required repairs. Holyrood is full time now. Holyrood will be
mothballed only when the Lower Churchill is running - and thats a long
ways away. Until then heating costs will continue to increase be it
oil or electric - IMO
Post by David
yea but they'll increase it just to make more money :) not because they
have to
Post by David
Electric will definitely increase, but seeing that about 50% of the
island's electric is hydro generation, the increase in crude does not
have the same degree of cost affect on electrical prices....
David
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
http://www.nlh.nl.ca/Hydroweb/hydroweb.nsf/GeneralDocs/A5FED4C87E741D...
Bump
h***@gmail.com
2015-03-23 01:36:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Has anyone looked into the cost/benefit of replacing the oil furnace and wiring your house for electric heat? I have a few friends who are electrians willing to lend a hand, does anyone have any thoughts on whats best?
cloud dreamer
2015-03-23 12:15:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by h***@gmail.com
Has anyone looked into the cost/benefit of replacing the oil furnace and wiring your house for electric heat? I have a few friends who are electrians willing to lend a hand, does anyone have any thoughts on whats best?
I'd do it in a heartbeat. No worries about oil spilling. No worries
about running out. No worries about deliveries in the middle of storms.
No worries about huge increases in prices overnight. No worry about
carbon monoxide poisoning.

My EPP for electric is just under $200 a month for electric. Has been
roughly that for years. Can't beat the stability.

And a house without oil is soooooooooooo much easier to sell.

Add a propane fireplace if you want something for emergencies. (Keep
pilot light off...it burns 30 litres a month needlessly.)

..

Ed M.
2008-05-29 10:57:45 UTC
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This is a perfect analysis based on info I have received from my research as
well.

Unless you need to replace your current oil furnace, this switch is nowhere
near worth it right now. I was speaking with a rep from NL Power and he
avoids recommending the switch.
Post by IRONMAN
who does this in st.john's?what is the cost?would like some info on
this.thanks
On the NL Power web site there is a list of companies who do this. I
am doing the conversion once this current tank runs dry. Waiting for 2
more quotes to come in. With the removal of tank and furnace / install
new / install a stand alone hot water boiler + any electrical you are
looking between 3500 - 4000. This of course is cost effective for me
as I already have 200 amp service, which is required. The only reason
I am doing this is because my current furnace is shot and needs
replacing. The last thing to look at when looking at heat savings is
the heating unit. Spend your cash on insulation / windows / doors
first. At the end of the day I might save 100 dollars a month at
TODAYS oil prices. Some of the money I will recoup from the sale of
the old furnace + tank and lines / expansion tank (sold) + purchasing
and installing my own HW boiler. Either way were screwed as electric
will catch up. If my oil furnace were in good shape I would not even
consider it. Just purchase more fire wood and extra gift sweaters
under the xmas tree.
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