Discussion:
USAF B-36 Crash Site Near Clarenville
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Mardon
2011-12-27 15:37:26 UTC
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I've just posted a new video to YouTube. It records a trip I made to the
crash site of the USAF RB-36H bomber, tail number 51-13721, near Burgoynes
Cove. The crash occurred the night of March 17-18, 1953, on a hill above
Nut Cove. Tom Drodge, who resides near the crash site in Shoal Harbour,
wrote a book about the crash titled, "Under the Radar: a Newfoundland
disaster." He published the book in December 2011. The trip recorded in
this video was in the Fall of 2011 for the purpose of taking some
photographs for inclusion in Tom's book. I accompanied Tom to the crash
site as did Ward Lockyer. I used some of the video and photos that I took
that day to make the YouTube video. The music used for the video was
composed and sung by the book's author. It is from Tom's Gospel album, "In
The Roof".

I'm curious if anyone else here has visited the crash site?

See:


Mardon
Stavka.CCCP-Red Army
2011-12-27 20:46:29 UTC
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I visited last summer. The hike is a little "wet" (then again, all last
summer was "wet") and the flies were quite vigorous.

The size of the aircraft was quite amazing. If you think about it:
* 6 x 19 foot diameter propellers
* 4 x jet engines
* tail over 60 feet high (and you can still see that at the crash site)
* wingspan over 230 feet (yes, two hundred and thirty)

The thing was massive. The story of how and why it crashed is quite
interesting as it the fact that a RB-29 (an old B-29 configured for
search and rescue) was lost off Stephenville's Harmon AFB in the search.
Post by Mardon
I've just posted a new video to YouTube. It records a trip I made to the
crash site of the USAF RB-36H bomber, tail number 51-13721, near Burgoynes
Cove. The crash occurred the night of March 17-18, 1953, on a hill above
Nut Cove. Tom Drodge, who resides near the crash site in Shoal Harbour,
wrote a book about the crash titled, "Under the Radar: a Newfoundland
disaster." He published the book in December 2011. The trip recorded in
this video was in the Fall of 2011 for the purpose of taking some
photographs for inclusion in Tom's book. I accompanied Tom to the crash
site as did Ward Lockyer. I used some of the video and photos that I took
that day to make the YouTube video. The music used for the video was
composed and sung by the book's author. It is from Tom's Gospel album, "In
The Roof".
I'm curious if anyone else here has visited the crash site?
http://youtu.be/yv6si9PrQwo
Mardon
Stavka.CCCP-Red Army
2011-12-27 20:56:30 UTC
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Ooops!!! That should have read SB-29 (for search and rescue). An RB-29
would have been a photo reconnaissance version..
I visited last summer. The hike is a little "wet" (then again, all last
summer was "wet") and the flies were quite vigorous.
* 6 x 19 foot diameter propellers
* 4 x jet engines
* tail over 60 feet high (and you can still see that at the crash site)
* wingspan over 230 feet (yes, two hundred and thirty)
The thing was massive. The story of how and why it crashed is quite
interesting as it the fact that a RB-29 (an old B-29 configured for
search and rescue) was lost off Stephenville's Harmon AFB in the search.
Post by Mardon
I've just posted a new video to YouTube. It records a trip I made to the
crash site of the USAF RB-36H bomber, tail number 51-13721, near Burgoynes
Cove. The crash occurred the night of March 17-18, 1953, on a hill above
Nut Cove. Tom Drodge, who resides near the crash site in Shoal Harbour,
wrote a book about the crash titled, "Under the Radar: a Newfoundland
disaster." He published the book in December 2011. The trip recorded in
this video was in the Fall of 2011 for the purpose of taking some
photographs for inclusion in Tom's book. I accompanied Tom to the crash
site as did Ward Lockyer. I used some of the video and photos that I took
that day to make the YouTube video. The music used for the video was
composed and sung by the book's author. It is from Tom's Gospel album, "In
The Roof".
I'm curious if anyone else here has visited the crash site?
http://youtu.be/yv6si9PrQwo
Mardon
Mardon
2011-12-27 21:31:48 UTC
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Post by Stavka.CCCP-Red Army
I visited last summer. The hike is a little "wet" (then again, all
last summer was "wet") and the flies were quite vigorous.
* 6 x 19 foot diameter propellers
* 4 x jet engines
* tail over 60 feet high (and you can still see that at the crash
site) * wingspan over 230 feet (yes, two hundred and thirty)
The thing was massive. The story of how and why it crashed is quite
interesting as it the fact that a RB-29 (an old B-29 configured for
search and rescue) was lost off Stephenville's Harmon AFB in the search.
Yes. The newly published book I mentioned, "Under the Radar: a
Newfoundland disaster." discusses all of those things.

See: http://youtu.be/yv6si9PrQwo

The hike wasn't especially wet when I visited.

Mardon
Warren
2011-12-27 21:34:17 UTC
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I recall my grandparents having a large piston that they said came from
the plane. It was used as an ashtray. No idea where it might have gone
since.

Is there was another crash site near Lady Cove Pond? I recall going to
that one on snow machine over 30 years ago with my dad.
Post by Mardon
I've just posted a new video to YouTube. It records a trip I made to the
crash site of the USAF RB-36H bomber, tail number 51-13721, near Burgoynes
Cove. The crash occurred the night of March 17-18, 1953, on a hill above
Nut Cove. Tom Drodge, who resides near the crash site in Shoal Harbour,
wrote a book about the crash titled, "Under the Radar: a Newfoundland
disaster." He published the book in December 2011. The trip recorded in
this video was in the Fall of 2011 for the purpose of taking some
photographs for inclusion in Tom's book. I accompanied Tom to the crash
site as did Ward Lockyer. I used some of the video and photos that I took
that day to make the YouTube video. The music used for the video was
composed and sung by the book's author. It is from Tom's Gospel album, "In
The Roof".
I'm curious if anyone else here has visited the crash site?
http://youtu.be/yv6si9PrQwo
Mardon
Warren
2011-12-27 21:43:53 UTC
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Hmmm, jet engines don't have pistons...
Something isn't right. :)
Post by Warren
I recall my grandparents having a large piston that they said came from
the plane. It was used as an ashtray. No idea where it might have gone
since.
Is there was another crash site near Lady Cove Pond? I recall going to
that one on snow machine over 30 years ago with my dad.
Mardon
2011-12-27 22:25:52 UTC
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Post by Warren
Hmmm, jet engines don't have pistons...
Something isn't right. :)
The RB-36H 'Peacemaker' that crashed in March 1953 near Nut Cove had six
R4360, 3,500 Hp piston engines and four J-47 jet engines of 5,200 lbs
thrust. It's all described in the book I mentioned in my OP. Parts of both
the jet engines and the piston engines can be seen in my video at
http://youtu.be/yv6si9PrQwo
Warren
2011-12-28 01:18:43 UTC
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My dad visited the crash when he was 9 years old. He knows where the
piston is. He said it was new and not used, so likely was cargo aboard
the plane, not part of the engine. Another of his friends pulled the
radio equipment out and may have had it until recently when the house
was sold. That would make a neat souvenir as well.

He said the other plane that went down near Lady Cove Pond was a DC-3.
Post by Mardon
Post by Warren
Hmmm, jet engines don't have pistons...
Something isn't right. :)
The RB-36H 'Peacemaker' that crashed in March 1953 near Nut Cove had six
R4360, 3,500 Hp piston engines and four J-47 jet engines of 5,200 lbs
thrust. It's all described in the book I mentioned in my OP. Parts of both
the jet engines and the piston engines can be seen in my video at
http://youtu.be/yv6si9PrQwo
Mardon
2011-12-29 23:14:50 UTC
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The book's author, Tom Drodge, gave an interview today (Dec 29, 2011) on
CBC Radio Noon. An MP3 file containing the interview audio can be
downloaded here:

http://www.JustUs.ca/post/CBCInterviewUnderTheRadar.mp3

It may take 30 seconds or so for the file to download before it starts
playing. My website doesn't support streaming audio, so the entire file
has to download before it will begin to play.
Post by Warren
My dad visited the crash when he was 9 years old. He knows where the
piston is. He said it was new and not used, so likely was cargo
aboard the plane, not part of the engine. Another of his friends
pulled the radio equipment out and may have had it until recently when
the house was sold. That would make a neat souvenir as well.
He said the other plane that went down near Lady Cove Pond was a DC-3.
Post by Mardon
Post by Warren
Hmmm, jet engines don't have pistons...
Something isn't right. :)
The RB-36H 'Peacemaker' that crashed in March 1953 near Nut Cove had
six R4360, 3,500 Hp piston engines and four J-47 jet engines of
5,200 lbs thrust. It's all described in the book I mentioned in my
OP. Parts of both the jet engines and the piston engines can be seen
in my video at http://youtu.be/yv6si9PrQwo
K***@edison.k12.nj.us
2017-06-05 14:28:07 UTC
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The Radar navigator, Harold G. Smith was my 2nd cousin. We always wondered what exactly happened to him then I found out all of this information. fascinating.

I am hoping to take a hike up there as well and pay my respects to him.

Kevin

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